Finding Time: A wild and empty journey to the Arctic Ocean – Three paddlers venture beyond the Brooks Range through America’s largest single tract of public land: Northwest Alaska’s National Petroleum Reserve

Three paddlers venture beyond the Brooks Range through America’s largest single tract of public land: Northwest Alaska’s National Petroleum Reserve, experiencing the enduring landscape drained by the Kokolik River in the context of a rapidly changing arctic region.

The post Finding Time: A wild and empty journey to the Arctic Ocean appeared first on Canoe & Kayak Magazine.

Why National Monument Reductions Matter – The Bears Ears/Grand Staircase-Escalante protection debate is about the president’s historic precedent, and the future of paddling’s cherished waterways

The Bears Ears/Grand Staircase-Escalante protection debate is about the president’s historic precedent, and the future of paddling’s cherished waterways

The post Why National Monument Reductions Matter appeared first on Canoe & Kayak Magazine.

OPINION: Trump’s Attack on Public Lands Just Got Personal – A Utah river runner weighs in on the largest rollback of public lands protections in U.S. history, including massive cuts to Bears Ears National Monument

A Utah river runner weighs in on the largest rollback of public lands protections in U.S. history, including massive cuts to Bears Ears National Monument

The post OPINION: Trump’s Attack on Public Lands Just Got Personal appeared first on Canoe & Kayak Magazine.

The Fall of the Grand Canyon Escalade – Navajo Nation turns down megaproject, but other threats to the Southwest’s most iconic river remain

Navajo Nation turns down mega-project that would have carried up to 10,000 tourists a day to the sacred confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado rivers — though other threats to the Southwest’s most iconic river remain.

The post The Fall of the Grand Canyon Escalade appeared first on Canoe & Kayak Magazine.

Recovering Paradise: Florida Keys Kayak Shops dig out after Hurricane Irma

People in the Florida Keys are known for being both quirky and scrappy. In the devastating aftermath of Hurricane Irma, which raked the low-lying islands September 10 with winds of 130 mph, it’s the latter quality that is in most demand. Irma came ashore that Sunday morning as a massive Category 4 hurricane packing 140-mph

The post Recovering Paradise: Florida Keys Kayak Shops dig out after Hurricane Irma appeared first on Canoe & Kayak Magazine.